Original Research

Assessing the test–retest reliability of career path appreciation as a measure of current and potential work decision-making capability

Rudolf M. Oosthuizen, Melinde Coetzee, Ester Kruger
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology | Vol 40, No 2 | a1199 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v40i2.1199 | © 2014 Rudolf M. Oosthuizen, Melinde Coetzee, Ester Kruger | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 21 February 2014 | Published: 21 August 2014

About the author(s)

Rudolf M. Oosthuizen, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, University of South Africa, South Africa
Melinde Coetzee, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, University of South Africa, South Africa
Ester Kruger, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, University of South Africa, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: Assessing and developing managerial decision-making capability in a complex and volatile marketplace is imperative for most South African businesses.

Purpose: The objective of this study was to assess the test–retest reliability of the career path appreciation (CPA) procedure in assessing current and potential levels of work decision-making capability. The study also explored whether different gender and race groups differed significantly in terms of these levels at two CPA assessments.

Motivation for the study: Limited recent test–retest research has been done regarding the reliability of the CPA technique as a tool for measuring the work decision-making capability of professional and managerial talent in the South African context. Scholars and practitioners in the field of industrial psychology could therefore benefit from follow-up research into the reliability of CPA.

Research approach, design and method: The research followed an ex post facto correlational design using longitudinal data of a non-probability purposive sample (N = 527) within the Bioss SA database.

Main findings: The results showed that the participants’ first CPA assessment scores correlated significantly and positively with their second CPA assessment scores. Gender and race groups differed significantly in their levels of current work decision-making capability at both assessments.

Practical/managerial implications: The CPA procedure can be used with confidence as an assessment tool in the selection, mentoring and development of high-potential managerial and professional talent for diverse gender and race groups.

Contribution/value-add: These findings contribute valuable information regarding the reliability of CPA and the differences between race and gender groups in the South African context.


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