Original Research

Exploring the factor structure of the Passion Scale: Are the dualistic types of passion relevant for workers in the South African context?

Marais S. Bester, Melinde Coetzee, Xander van Lill
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology | Vol 46 | a1788 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v46i0.1788 | © 2020 Marais S. Bester, Melinde Coetzee, Xander van Lill | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 27 February 2020 | Published: 01 December 2020

About the author(s)

Marais S. Bester, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Melinde Coetzee, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Xander van Lill, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, University of Johannesburg, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: It is not clear from research whether the dualistic model holds true across binary ethnic and gender groups in the South African organisational context.

Research purpose: The present research aimed to test the validity and reliability of the two-factor Passion Scale and to assess for measurement invariance of the two-factor scale across binary ethnic and gender groups in the South African context.

Motivation of the study: The construct of passion helps to better understand some of the psychological attributes that contribute to experiences of either well-being or strain at work and is therefore an important attribute to measure.

Research approach, design and method: The study involved a convenience sample (N = 550) of managerial and staff-level South African employees from various industries with a mean age of 34 years (SD = 10.95). Confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory structural equation modelling, t-tests and tests for measurement invariance were performed.

Main findings: The results confirmed the validity and measurement invariance of the two-factor structure of the Passion Scale in the South African work context. The observed differences between the ethnic groups and men and women were practically small.

Practical/managerial implications: Well-being interventions should consider the use of the Passion Scale as a measure of the psychological attributes that explain differentiating experiences of harmonious and obsessive passion in the workplace.

Contribution/value-add: The findings provided encouraging evidence for the relevance and usefulness of the Passion Scale’s dualistic model of passion for people of different binary ethnic and gender groups in South African organisations.


Keywords

harmonious passion; obsessive passion; Passion Scale; dualistic model of passion; two-factor structure of the Passion Scale in South Africa; measurement invariance of the Passion Scale.

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