Original Research

‘What are psychology journals publishing about the world of work?’: A systematised review

Salome E. Scholtz, Leon T. de Beer, Werner de Klerk
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology | Vol 46 | a1808 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v46i0.1808 | © 2020 Salome E. Scholtz, Leon T. de Beer, Werner de Klerk | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 May 2020 | Published: 09 September 2020

About the author(s)

Salome E. Scholtz, WorkWell Research Unit, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Leon T. de Beer, WorkWell Research Unit, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Werner de Klerk, Psychosocial Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Orientation: Work-related research from the perspective of psychology journal publications is reviewed, indicating research topic trends and research method use.

Research purpose: What psychology journals are publishing about work-related topics as well as how these topics are being investigated was indicated. The specific objectives of this study were to analyse what research methods are being used, how these methods are being used and for what topics in work-related research.

Motivation for the study: The lack of studies that investigate the use of research methods and work-related study themes from the perspective of miscellaneous psychology journals prompted this study.

Research approach/design and method: A systematised review design was followed based on data collected by a previous study. Work-related research articles (n = 73) from five top-tier international miscellaneous or general psychology journals (published between 2013 and 2017) were collected and categorised.

Main findings: Quantitative methods, convenience samples, cross-sectional designs and questionnaires for data collection as well as analysis of variance were the most frequently used methodologies. Workplace relationships, job search quality and re-employment and work stress were the most frequently investigated topics.

Practical/managerial implications: Researchers should pay attention to the areas that lack methodological transparency in their studies to address the replication crisis in psychology. Method use should be expanded beyond quantitative methods where applicable. Industrial and organisational psychologists are reminded of their identity as applied psychologists.

Contribution/value-add: The use of research methods in work-related research published by psychology journals is presented. Trends for this sample as well as areas for improving the replication crisis in psychology were identified.


Keywords

applied psychology; industrial and organisational psychology; psychology publication; research methodology; research trends; replication crisis; quantitative methods; convenience sampling.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1283
Total article views: 521


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.