Opinion Paper

Neuromyths in Industrial and Organisational Psychology in South Africa: Prevalence and impact

Ingra du Buisson-Narsai, Talia Fisher, Andrew Morris, Xander van Lill
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology | Vol 50 | a2097 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v50i0.2097 | © 2024 Ingra du Buisson-Narsai, Talia Fisher, Andrew Morris, Xander van Lill | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 27 March 2023 | Published: 29 March 2024

About the author(s)

Ingra du Buisson-Narsai, NeuroCapital Consulting and Global Institute of Organisational Neuroscience Pty Ltd, Johannesburg, South Africa
Talia Fisher, Pivotal Consulting, Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israel; and Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Andrew Morris, Department of Product and Research, JVR Africa Group, Johannesburg, South Africa
Xander van Lill, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa; and Department of Product and Research, JVR Africa Group, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: Industrial Psychologists (IPs) could significantly benefit from integrating neuroscientific evidence into their practices, provided they critically engage with scholarly research rather than rely on unsupported assertions.

Research purpose: The study aimed to assess the prevalence of neuroscientific misconceptions among IPs, student psychologists, and intern psychologists in South Africa as well as advocate for enhanced foundational knowledge in applied organisational neuroscience within industrial psychology.

Motivation for the study: The emerging field of organisational neuroscience, which applies brain science to workplace behaviour, is particularly vulnerable to misconceptions that could hinder its development.

Research approach/design and method: Using a cross-sectional survey, this research evaluated the knowledge of neuro misconceptions at one point in time within a convenience sample of (n = 98), consisting of registered student psychologists (n = 7; 7%), intern psychologists (n = 8; 10%), and IPs (n = 83; 85%).

Main findings: Results indicated that this sample endorses many neuromyth conceptions. There was significant disparity in the endorsement of misconceptions between those with and without neuroscientific training, highlighting a knowledge gap.

Practical/managerial implications: These findings underscore the necessity for improved education in applied organisational neuroscience among IOPs, suggesting integration into training and education programs.

Contribution/value-add: This pioneering study in South Africa emphasises the role of general knowledge, specific training in applied organisational neuroscience, and critical thinking in psychological research as key to combating neuromyths, marking a meaningful contribution to the field.


Keywords

organisational neuroscience; neuromyths; applied neuroscience; neuroeducation; organisational psychology.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 205
Total article views: 163


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.