Original Research - Special Collection: COVID-19

COVID-19 and the future of work and organisational psychology

Amalia Pérez-Nebra, Chrysavgi Sklaveniti, Gazi Islam, Ivana Petrović, Jennifer Pickett, Makfire Alija, P. Matthijs Bal, Milena Tekeste, Milica Vukelić, Sandiso Bazana, Zoe Sanderson
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology | Vol 47 | a1854 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v47i0.1854 | © 2021 Amalia Pérez-Nebra, Chrysavgi Sklaveniti, Gazi Islam, Ivana Petrović, Jennifer Pickett, Makfire Alija, P. Matthijs Bal, Milena Tekeste, Milica Vukelić, Sandiso Bazana, Zoe Sanderson | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 12 November 2020 | Published: 14 May 2021

About the author(s)

Amalia Pérez-Nebra, Department of Administration, University of Brasília, Brasilia, Brazil
Chrysavgi Sklaveniti, Institute of Organizational Psychology, School of Management, University of St. Gallen, St. Gallen, Switzerland
Gazi Islam, Department of People, Organizations and Society, Grenoble Ecole de Management, Grenoble, France; and, Institute for Research in Management and Economics (IREGE), Savoie Mont Blanc University, Geneva, Switzerland
Ivana Petrović, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
Jennifer Pickett, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
Makfire Alija, Bruegel Think Tank, Brussels, Belgium
P. Matthijs Bal, Lincoln International Business School, Brayford Wharf, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, United Kingdom
Milena Tekeste, School of Business and Management, Faculty of Organisation Studies, Royal Holloway University of London, London, United Kingdom
Milica Vukelić, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
Sandiso Bazana, Department of People, Organizations and Society, Grenoble Ecole de Management, Grenoble, France;, and, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Humanities, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
Zoe Sanderson, School of Management, Social Sciences and Law, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom


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Abstract

Orientation: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a ‘coronafication’ of research and academia, including the instrumentalisation of academic research towards the demands of society and governments. Whilst an enormous number of special issues and articles are devoted on the topic, there are few fundamental reflections on how the current pandemic will affect science and work and organisational psychology in the long run.

Research purpose: The current overview, written by a group of members of the Future of Work and Organisational Psychology (FOWOP) Movement, focuses on the central issues relating to work and organisational psychology that have emerged as a result of the COVID-19 crisis.

Motivation for the study: The study discusses the inability of dominant theories in work and organisational psychology to understand contemporary problems and the need to advance the theoretical realm of work psychology. We also discuss the need for pluralism in methodologies to understand the post-COVID-19 workplace, the urgency of attending to neglected voices and populations during the COVID-19 crisis and teaching during COVID-19.

Research approach/design and method: This article uses conceptual argumentation.

Main findings: The COVID-19 crisis forces work psychology to address at least its theorising, methods, unheard voices and teaching in the COVID-19 crisis.

Practical/managerial implications: On the basis of this article, researchers and practitioners may be better aware of the neglected perspectives in the current pandemic.

Contribution/value-add: This article adds to the understanding of the future directions for a sustainable Work and Organisational Psychology as an applied scientific discipline during and beyond the COVID-19 crisis.


Keywords

COVID-19; corona; work and organisational psychology; theory; neglected perspectives

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