Original Research

Technology readiness, technology acceptance, and work engagement: A mediational analysis

Thembekile K. Khoza, Tshegofatso Mabitsela, Petrus Nel
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology | Vol 50 | a2131 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v50i0.2131 | © 2024 Thembekile K. Khoza, Tshegofatso Mabitsela, Petrus Nel | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 07 August 2023 | Published: 19 March 2024

About the author(s)

Thembekile K. Khoza, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, School of Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Tshegofatso Mabitsela, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, School of Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Petrus Nel, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, School of Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: Organisations are increasingly integrating technology to enhance employee productivity and strategic goals. However, the acceptance of such technology is dependent on employees’ attitudes.

Research purpose: This study seeks to understand: (1) the influence of employees’ levels of technology readiness and technology acceptance on their work engagement and (2) whether technology acceptance mediates the relationship between technology readiness and work engagement.

Motivation for the study: Drawing from the Technology Readiness and Acceptance Model (TRAM), the Worker-Centric Design and Evaluation Framework for Operator 4.0 and the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) theory, we posit that technology readiness and acceptance function as resources aiding employees in effectively navigating workplace technology, potentially fostering greater engagement.

Research approach/design and method: Using a quantitative, cross-sectional approach, we examined 143 working adults’ technology readiness, technology acceptance and work engagement. Structural equation modelling (Partial Least Squares) guided the evaluation of hypotheses.

Main findings: Results revealed a positive relationship between technology readiness and work engagement. Interestingly, technology acceptance showed a negative link with work engagement. Furthermore, technology acceptance partly mediated the direct link between technology readiness and work engagement. Notably, the significant and negative indirect effect suggests a potential suppressor variable role for technology acceptance.

Practical/managerial implications: Practically, organisations should recognise the dual impact of technology on work engagement. When technology is perceived as a demand, interventions are crucial to counteract its adverse effects on engagement.

Contribution/value-add: The study brings a multidisciplinary perspective to understanding how personal resources in the face of workplace technology can foster work engagement.


Keywords

technology readiness; technology acceptance; work engagement; personal resources; job demands

JEL Codes

L20: General

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

Metrics

Total abstract views: 1090
Total article views: 1131

 

Crossref Citations

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