Original Research

Social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave in a utility organisation

Eugeny Hennicks, Marita M. Heyns, Sebastiaan Rothmann
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology | Vol 48 | a1928 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajip.v48i0.1928 | © 2022 Eugeny Hennicks, Marita M. Heyns, Sebastiaan Rothmann | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 15 July 2021 | Published: 11 March 2022

About the author(s)

Eugeny Hennicks, Optentia Research Entity, Faculty of Humanities, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa; and, Department of Labour Relations Management, Faculty of Economic Management Sciences, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Marita M. Heyns, Optentia Research Entity, Faculty of Humanities, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Sebastiaan Rothmann, Optentia Research Entity, Faculty of Humanities, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: Employee social well-being is likely to influence individual and organisational outcomes, especially in African countries where a high premium is often placed on one’s personhood being rooted in one’s relations with others.

Research purpose: This study investigated the associations between social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave in a South African utility organisation.

Motivation for the study: Given the history of relationships amongst diverse people in South Africa, social well-being seems to be a critical component of the overall well-being of employees. However, few studies in South Africa have focused on social well-being in organisational contexts.

Research approach/design and method: A cross-sectional survey design was used, targeting permanent employees in a South African utility organisation. Consenting participants (N = 403) completed previously validated measures of social well-being, job satisfaction, organisational citizenship behaviour and intentions to leave. Structural equation modelling was performed to test hypotheses.

Main findings: Social well-being was positively associated with job satisfaction and organisational citizenship behaviour and negatively associated with intentions to leave. Social well-being indirectly affected organisational citizenship behaviour and intention to leave through job (dis)satisfaction.

Practical/managerial implications: Managers and human resources practitioners are alerted to practical ways of sustaining employees’ social well-being such as by implementing tailor-made policies that support social aspects of well-being and by ensuring the alignment of well-being programmes with changing circumstances in the modern world of work.

Originality/value-add: This study illuminated social well-being associations with selected outcomes in a developing African country workplace context.


Keywords

social well-being; job satisfaction; organisational citizenship behaviour; intentions to leave; utility organisation

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